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As of now Google Classroom is available to all Google Apps for Education
(GAFE) users.

Classroom is a tool within the GAFE that allows teachers to set up
different classes, set projects, assign homework to groups and grade them
all within a single space.  Classroom also records student grades and
progress.  It should be a worthwhile assessment tool once you have begun
using it with your students for a couple of months.

Remember, what you are using at the moment is essentially Classroom 1.0 and
as such it is quite limited in it’s functionality and flexibility, but so
was everything in Google Apps when it was first released and Google have
certainly demonstrated a commitment to upgrade and enhance their products
continually.

It will take you all of about 2 minutes to set up your class and get
cooking so all I can suggest is give it a shot and see where it takes you.
 You certainly won’t be wasting your time fro my brief encounter with it so
far.

Here are a couple of resources and links to get you started and I’d love to
hear about your experiences thus far.

 

 

 

Source: www.edgalaxy.com

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“ As I move in to a role where I will be working with other colleagues on a more formal basis when it comes to e-learning, I have been reflecting upon different Apps. I was thinking about SAMR and which Apps can have transformative learning linked to them, if used properly. The list started growing quite …”

Source: createinnovateexplore.com

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Edutopia is one of my favourite web sites. It has recently run a series written by Monica Burns aka @ClassTechTips featuring Resources for Using iPads across multiple grade levels. Though I’ve featured them each individually here on iPads in Education I thought it might be useful to post all of the series in one collection.

Resources for Using iPads in Grades K-2 http://bit.ly/Tag2sg

Resources for Using iPads in Grades 3-5 http://bit.ly/1owxjbR

Resources for Using iPads in Grades 6-8 http://bit.ly/1qHU1j3

Resources for Using iPads in Grades 9-12 http://bit.ly/QPzKrp

Awesome! Thanks Edutopia!

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Through the course of our “summer school” here at Techfaster we’ve met plenty of tech savvy educators. From ISTE in early July to the NAESP show and Campus Tech that wrapped up this week, teachers, administrators and education enthusiasts were learning, sharing, and networking with each other. These are definitely the tech savvy teacher type, and that’s validated in the infographic below from Daily Genius. But just because you spent part of the summer at EdTech conferences doesn’t necessarily mean you are a tech savvy teacher. Of course the reverse is true as well, maybe you had family events and your own kids to tend to during the summer. Are you a tech savvy teacher? A strong indicator would be that you’re even reading this article here at techfaster.com. Are you keeping your students, parents, fellow teachers and administrators up to date with the goings on in your classroom with your own blog? That’s a good sign you’re a tech savvy teacher. Just think about what the communication you can have with a blog, would have been like in the days of the ditto machine? You would have to plan out your thoughts, outline them, create a ditto original, print them, pass them out to students, and just pray they didn’t end up on the floor of the school bus. Are you networking with other teachers you’ve never met on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest or a knowledge sharing educational site? Are you regularly attending edtech chat or listening to podcasts? All of these are signs that you care about your own professional development, living in current times and caring about your students. YouTube, Twitter, SnapChat, Minecraft, Instagram, and Vine are all a part of your students lives. Facebook, Pinterest and email are all a part of your students’ parents’ lives. You’re almost too far behind if you’re not a “tech savvy” teacher. Check out the infographic below and see how you stack up.

Source: www.techfaster.com

http://goo.gl/5pWPtf

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Parent teacher interviews can be one of the most stressful nights of the
year.  Especially if you have never done one before. 

Usually, you only have about ten minutes to impress upon these people that
you are both competent in your role, and you also genuinely care as much
for their children as mum and dad do.  Sometimes this might be the only ten
minutes you get for the year together.

Today we are going to look at a surefire winner that will ensure your
meeting finishes on a high no matter what.  We are going to create some QR
Cubes for you to take home to parents on the night that will be of use to
them all year long.

The idea is that they take their cube home scan the codes with their phone
at home and gain insights into what has happened in the classroom or find
out strategies for improving future learning opportunities at home.

So,  Let’s go through the process.  You might want to set aside half an
hour to do this for your entire class.

Firstly you will need to find 6 ( minimum amount for one dice- but make as
many dice as you wish. ) items that you wish to share on your cube. 

Remember everything you direct them to needs to be based on the internet
for this to work.  Examples of this might be…

1:  A video link to your classes input into this years school concert. 
Youtube or private video hosting will work.

2:  A link to your class blog outlining what has been happening in the
classroom.

3:  A link to video you have made about expectations for parents in your
class. ie:  – How much should your child be reading etc.

4:  A link to some math’s or literacy games you have approved for use in
your class that can be played on phones or computers.

5:  A link to your email or twitter account so that parents can ask you
questions at any time.

6:  A link to free posters you can put up around the house to help out with
tables or spelling etc.

Then you need to convert your links into QR codes.  This will take no more
than 5 minutes to do all 6.  Simply watch my instructional video below on
how to do this.

So then you simply need to copy and paste your QR codes onto a 3D dice
template which can be found here.

Print up a class set.  Get your students to make them at school and be sure
to give one out to parents at the meeting.  It will certainly show them
something they have never seen in their own experience of school, and makes
a great first impression.

If parents need a little info about QR codes you can direct them here.

Finally.  You don’t have to make dice you can take this in any direction
you want.  Id love to hear your thoughts and ideas.

 

Source: www.edgalaxy.com

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This article is intended for three groups of people…

— those who aren’t on Twitter and don’t see what the fuss is about
— those who are new to Twitter and want to get the most from it
— those who are trying to persuade colleagues to get on board and want something vaguely lively to show them by way of persuasion…

So, rather than doing this the usual, boring, way we’re going to attempt this article through the medium of Skittles (Twittles, so to speak). Sweets can be very persuasive.

Source: www.sparkyteaching.com

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Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 1.28.24 PM
Lessons for schools considering going all digital
 

Just one year after his high school went all digital, vice principal Frank Portanova shares three tips for other schools considering what he says has been a successful and exciting transformation. In this commentary, he writes that the transformation does not happen immediately, that it is important to ensure that infrastructure needs are met and that teachers and students are on board.

read the full story: http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/07/22/school-digital-transformation-395/

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How To Create QR Codes To Use In Your Classroom Wednesday, July 23, 2014    No comments

 

What are QR Codes and How Can I Use them in my Classroom?  A QR Code is a type of barcode that is readable by dedicatedQR barcode readers and camera telephones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded may be text you want students to read, websites, or vide

Source: www.mrswideen.com

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Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 9.01.51 AM

 

Hey Fellow Teachers:

Now is the time your toot your horn and yes, I know educators are pretty bad at tooting their own horns.  But we should! Or nominate a colleague.  Either way, it is a good thing.  Show off what you are doing in your classrooms! Nominate yourself or a colleague who is deserving of being recognized as one of the nations’ top innovators.  15 awards to be handed out in November.

Why Awards?

Sharing. Innovating. Showcasing. Words that we hear in conversations, but so infrequently when it comes to awarding individuals and teams heavily involved in the education sector. That is, until now.

EdSurge and Digital Promise have partnered to create the first annual ”Digital Innovation in Learning Awards” (or the DILAs), a joint effort to celebrate what you are accomplishing in edtech, and more importantly, howit’s being accomplished. For far-reaching impact, we will share videos from winners with the greater edtech community, so as to proliferate the winners’ work and give the edtech community ideas for their own usage.

Checkout the details: http://awards.edsurge.com 

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My wife came home the other day and started describing a new problem arising in her school, where students were claiming to be tired of using devices for everything. The students were apparently saying “Can’t we just do a lesson on paper today or you just teach us.” As she told me this, my wife didn’t notice that she was simultaneously picking up her iPad to check Facebook and that made me think.

 

Source: ipad4schools.org

http://goo.gl/fbCZDR

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This is a collection of images sources from around the internet. Most are free or free to use via a Creative Commons license.I really like […]
Aug 9, 2014 / Add Comment